This may not be so interesting, but it gives me a giggle.

I was looking for the year I performed in a dance show called By Physical Means, choreographed by Felicity MacDonald. It was on at Dancehouse in Melbourne and was my first official gig as a dancer.

In my google search I found a link to an old biography of mine that had been translated into French for some performances I was doing with Rosalind Crisp in France last decade(!). Of course, google kindly offered to translate it for me, which is what you see above. Some odd grammar and phrasing, but mostly it reads ok (particularly given it was written in english translated to french then machine translated back to english).

But check out the sentence that starts “In 1995 David began a thorough study…”

…so now you all know.

This may not be so interesting, but it gives me a giggle.

I was looking for the year I performed in a dance show called By Physical Means, choreographed by Felicity MacDonald. It was on at Dancehouse in Melbourne and was my first official gig as a dancer.

In my google search I found a link to an old biography of mine that had been translated into French for some performances I was doing with Rosalind Crisp in France last decade(!). Of course, google kindly offered to translate it for me, which is what you see above. Some odd grammar and phrasing, but mostly it reads ok (particularly given it was written in english translated to french then machine translated back to english).

But check out the sentence that starts “In 1995 David began a thorough study…”

…so now you all know.

"…as a basic focus, the dancers remain in physical touch, mutually supportive and innovative, meditating upon the physical laws relating to their masses: gravity, momentum, inertia and friction."

Steve Paxton talking about Contact Improvisation.

He also said

When an apple fell on his head, Isaac Newton was inspired to describe his three laws of motion. These became the foundation of our ideas about physics. Being essentially objective, Newton ignored what it feels like to be the apple

tim and maddie

Madeleine Flynn and Tim Humphrey are Melbourne based musician/composers working in installation, theatre, dance and academia.

quite simply, they rock.

but not literally… although i’m sure if they really wanted to they could.

anyway, they’ve got an installation work on as part of Dance Massive in Melbourne these next two weeks. it’s an installation work called Music for Imagined Dances and is running in the gallery space at Dancehouse.

you can watch them talking about it right here:

i’ve got a short piece in the installation. if you go, there’s a small chance it might get played while you’re there.

Tags: art dance music

adelinalarsson:

For Force Majeure, Kate Champion Cultivate
by performer: Adelina Larsson

adelina. lovely.

but what’s with the balding guy with the moustache at the end of the clip? you don’t need him ;)

Choreographer Lucy Guerin is looking for untrained male dancers to be part of her latest show.

If you think you can’t dance, then ‘Untrained’ is for you!

It’s a professional, contemporary dance show featuring two entirely untrained dancers, and they’re holding auditions in Bendigo for you to be part of it.

Acclaimed choreographer Lucy Guerin is behind this intriguing production, and as she explained the concept to Fiona Parker.

“It’s sort of a comparison between how dancers that are highly trained approach activities compared to just your regular ordinary person,” she says.

“I think the interesting thing about the work is that we do get to see how amazing (professional) dancers are… (and) see how interesting it is to watch the effort of someone who perhaps can’t do these things quite as well, but how intriguing it is to just watch that focus and effort go into attempting some of these things.”

Auditions are on in Bendigo on Friday 11th March, 2011, with the tour through Central, Western and North West Victoria in July.

For more information call Anne at the Capital on (03) 5434 6007.

lucy guerin is an accomplished choreographer. i’ve always enjoyed her work - and i particularly like the fact that she’s putting up archives of her older material on her website. some of these old works were simply stunning for the simplicity of design and focus on dance alone. i also saw them when contemporary dance was very new to me - so they’ve left a big mark.

I haven’t seen untrained so really can’t comment on what it’s like. while the premise is interesting, i think it’s a bit of a one trick pony. it appears to use task based choreography to expose the difference between un/trained bodies for some entertainment - which is not necessarily a bad thing. but what i find fascinating about untrained bodies is not how well/poorly they can execute instructions (as compared to a trained body), but what they can convey in movement that isn’t informed by years of patterning exercises developed with their own understanding of dance/choreography. rather than imposed rules to make untrained dance, i think it’s far more engaging to see people using resources/tools to create their own dance.

(Source: bridgettelizabeth)

Tags: dance

Photograph by Lisa Saad

This was from a gig I did way back in 2002. We spent the 10 days of the Next Wave Festival living on the spire as part of a Colony of angels. We do a choreographed performance each evening, and during the day interact with people on the ground by climbing down to the ‘skirts’ and lowering notebooks. There were some incredible responses to the work - thoughtful and moving. I remember the opening night performance though - there was a fly line from the ground up to the spire that one of the performers got hoisted along at the very beginning, a very exciting opening moment. In this performance though, she had a trail of flags attached to the wire behind her and they snagged. She ended up hanging stuck for about 10 minutes while the music played on and the riggers tried to solve the problem. From memory I think she ended up having to cut the flag line loose. But I also remember one of the riggers jugging up the middle of the spire like he was in a race - incredible amount of strength and fitness (sadly only we could see him though).

It was such a privilege to work and play in the space. Not many people get to experience sunset and daybreak from the top of the Arts Centre Spire. I remember how fascinating it was to look across at the nearby skyscrapers and see other people living at such height - yet sheltered and cocooned from the elements. I made some great friends on that gig. I guess that happens when there’s such a high level of trust and unique/new experiences. Strangely that reminds me of medical school too.

Oh, yeah, in case you were wondering, I’m the one wearing yellow.
Photograph by Lisa Saad

This was from a gig I did way back in 2002. We spent the 10 days of the Next Wave Festival living on the spire as part of a Colony of angels. We do a choreographed performance each evening, and during the day interact with people on the ground by climbing down to the ‘skirts’ and lowering notebooks. There were some incredible responses to the work - thoughtful and moving. I remember the opening night performance though - there was a fly line from the ground up to the spire that one of the performers got hoisted along at the very beginning, a very exciting opening moment. In this performance though, she had a trail of flags attached to the wire behind her and they snagged. She ended up hanging stuck for about 10 minutes while the music played on and the riggers tried to solve the problem. From memory I think she ended up having to cut the flag line loose. But I also remember one of the riggers jugging up the middle of the spire like he was in a race - incredible amount of strength and fitness (sadly only we could see him though).

It was such a privilege to work and play in the space. Not many people get to experience sunset and daybreak from the top of the Arts Centre Spire. I remember how fascinating it was to look across at the nearby skyscrapers and see other people living at such height - yet sheltered and cocooned from the elements. I made some great friends on that gig. I guess that happens when there’s such a high level of trust and unique/new experiences. Strangely that reminds me of medical school too.

Oh, yeah, in case you were wondering, I’m the one wearing yellow.

infinitelastbreath:

“AMPLIFICATION” Balletlab Rehearsal 2011

amplification is now over a decade old.

some of these shots look so familiar… maybe just from having seen most of philip adams’ work. i wonder what it would be like to view video of the first performance and overlay with the latest? compare the new dancers with old. i wonder if it has been reworked? so many questions :)

(via infinitelastbreath-deactivated2)

"Another [contact improvisation partner] told me that often I wasn’t giving my weight fully. That I hold back in the dance, leaving a sense of mistrust in the dance for the partner and me […]"

- Jonathan Sinatra «pouring : a contact skill to explore»

i don’t always give my weight fully, but thats a choice i make whilst dancing CI. usually the early part of a duet with someone new involves me revealing this choice (or option), to my partner. i don’t want to come across as unskilled, but nor do i want to always share all my weight.

(via quodlibet)

Tags: dance

bridgettelizabeth:

Vollmond (via BAMorg)

what a fine looking set Pina Bausch has got there. would be interested to see the work - these snippets are enticing.

found this little extract from the work on youtube. there’s a bunch more. this guy reminds me of jacob in some ways - that combination of highly trained but moving in more pedestrian ways. i guess that’s what Pina does…

Tags: dance

document document document

in my arts practice i’ve been interested in ongoing (and parallel) documentation of works i’m making. this has been a big part of my work with skellis and jacob lehrer. and blogs have been the main format for maintaining the document.

i find them fascinating records to look back on - but also vitally useful in terms of the creative process.

in medicine documentation is also used ubiquitously. the document then traverses and conveys the condition, pathway, management, treatment and outcome of a patient (amongst other things). clinical notes in hospitals are ideally a way to allow various clinicians to communicate with each other about the patient in question. they’re also a legal document that keeps track of who did what and what was done when and what was discussed and consented to and so on and so forth.

it really is a vital part of health care. and not always done particularly well.

i had an experience recently that reminded me of the importance of documenting everything that happens. i was on rotation in the ED and had seen a few interesting patients (one with ?SAH / ?Bell’s Palsy and another with Tuberous Sclerosis) when a consultant i hadn’t met asked me if i would like to see a patient. he then sent me to see a young child with vomiting and diarrhoea to take a history and do an examination.

as i approached the child and mother i was already thinking about the recent outbreak of rotavirus at the hospital. not something i wanted to get and take home to a 7 week old baby. so i determined to take the history and leave the examination to the consultant.

this all went well and i wrote up my notes then went to speak to the consultant. i presented the case and then explained why i hadn’t done an examination. he said that was fine and that he understood and that he would take care of it. i went back and spoke with the nurse attending this child and explained that the consultant would be coming to examine the patient.

i then signed the history i had taken and left for lunch and to do some study.

when i returned to the ward a few people told me that there had been some problems with the patient - that no-one had seen the child for 2 hours after i saw him (he was not a well child - dehydrated and malnourished). and, despite me telling the nurse what was happening and having a verbal confirmation from the consultant that he would “take care of it”, that had not happened. in fact, nothing at all had happened.

so the new consultant on call spoke with me to find out what had happened. it looked like it was going to be some reprimands, but i felt i had done enough and explained what had happened. but, now on thinking about documentation, i hadn’t done enough.

while the final responsibility for the patient remained with the consulting doctor, it was also my responsibility to make sure anyone who would become involved with the patient would know what was going on. i should have documented that i’d spoken with that particular consultant and noted the discussion. that way, if the patient was missed in hand over - or any other clinician coming into the ward saw the patient they’d know what had happened so far.

ultimately, in this case, nothing terrible happened - but it was a good reminder of the importance of documentation, both as a way to address accountability and as a means of best managing the health care of the patient.